Climbing temps to reach mid-90s by Saturday

07/21/2011 1:54 PM |

Get ready to grab those ice pops and pump that air-conditioner. Temperatures are expected reach the upper 80s on the North Fork today, and climb as high as 93 degrees Friday and 94 degrees Saturday, according to the National Weather Service in Upton.

A weak cold front is predicted to move into the area Sunday, when the temperature is only expected to be about 85.

The high temperatures are the result of a ridge of high pressure moving from the west, said NWS meteorologist John Murray. The heat index could make temperatures feel as high as 100 to 105 degrees in some areas.

“It’s the combination of heat and humidity,” Mr. Murray.

Today’s temperature is still expected to be much lower than the highest recorded temperature at Long Island MacArthur Airport for this day, which was 104 degrees in 1977, according to the NWS.

An air quality alert has been issued the area from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m. today, Thursday, by the state Department of Environmental Conservation and Department of Health.

There are high levels of ground-level ozone, which is formed by summer heat and is a major component of smog. Automobile exhaust and out-of-state emission are the main causes of ground-level ozone, which shouldn’t be confused with the protective layer of ozone in the upper atmosphere, the DEC warned.

Those who exercise outdoors, are involved in vigorous outdoor work and have respiratory diseases should limit strenuous outdoor physical activity, the two departments suggest. Those experiencing symptoms like shortness of breath, chest pain or coughing should consult a doctor.

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat watch in neighboring Nassau County, though that warning does not extend to Suffolk.

No power outages were reported by the Long Island Power Authority on the North Fork as of this morning.

The Suffolk County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty is warning pet owners not to leave their animals in a parked car for any period of time. Temperature inside a parked car can reach dangerous levels of 120° in just a matter of minutes, Suffolk SPCA officials said.

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