Dining Guide: Tweed’s Restaurant

08/02/2011 8:57 AM |

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Standing from left: Maitre 'D/waiter Thomas McSwane and owner Ed Tuccio. Seated from left: waitress/bartender Marzena Zacharewicz, bartender Ron Darling, bartender Elliot Rothstein and waitress Alvyda Zukas.

Owner(s): Edwin Fishel Tuccio

Year established: 1896

Location: 17 E. Main Street, Riverhead

Phone: 631-208-3151

Attire: Casual

Wheelchair accessible: Yes

Hours: Daily lunch & dinner, 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.

Web site: tweedsrestaurant.com

The menu at Tweed’s Restaurant and Buffalo Bar, located in the historic J.J. Sullivan Hotel in downtown Riverhead, invites diners to “experience the oldest hotel and restaurant on the North Fork,” fully restored and featuring Victorian chandeliers, stained glass, the original stamped tin ceiling, an oak fireplace and a mahogany and marble bar, which was built for the 1893 World Exposition in Chicago.

Known for serving locally raised bison, Tweed’s offers dining options for a wide range of palates, and features fresh seafood with new catches coming in daily, along with a raw bar with oysters, shrimp and clams served every day and fresh steamers.

A very popular item just added to the menu is elk, served in a variety of steak styles, and tasting like good beef, according to owner Edwin Tuccio. The lunch menu offers house-made fresh mozzarella, crab cakes, and a vegetable Napoleon, along with an Asian tuna salad and marinated bison steak salad. Two types of burgers are available, organic beef or bison, as well as bison chili, baked salmon or an Aquebogue duck wrap.

Dinner features filet mignon, sesame-seared sashimi tuna, sliced bison hanger steak and grilled bison “cowboy steak,” among many selections.

“At Tweed’s, we make every effort to use local products whenever possible,” says Mr. Tuccio. “First, because it is better; but most importantly, it supports the local economy, which in turn supports and preserves a way of life that we treasure.”

The Dining Guide is not a review column. It appears as a courtesy to Times/Review Newspapers advertisers.