Greenport Historic Preservation Commission says no to vinyl

09/15/2011 12:58 AM |

Greenport’s Historic Preservation Commission has again sent the message that no one in the village’s historic district will get approval for the use of vinyl.

That goes for siding, fencing or any other residential use.

Homeowner Lisa Skiptunis, who sought permission to put up a vinyl fence, got the message loud and clear during the commission’s Monday night meeting. As a result, Ms. Skiptunis told the panel she’ll go with cedar at her 432 First St. home rather than pursue a lengthy battle she’d likely lose.

Some homeowners in the historic district have used vinyl, commission chairman Frank Uellendahl said, but none obtained HPC approval. The owners of a Bay Avenue house who illegally vinyl-sided the building can’t sell it because it lacks a certificate of occupancy, according to village officials.

“I seriously have difficulty approving anything that is visible that is vinyl,” Mr. Uellendahl said.

“I hope you’re around to help me maintain it,” Ms. Skiptunis replied.

In other business, commissioners approved a wrought iron fence in front of the Sasuke restaurant at 216 Main St., but asked that its height be in line with similar fences erected by other property owners on the block. Owner Frank Purita had requested a four-foot structure, which is higher than most nearby fences. They also asked the Planning Board to request similar wrought iron fencing in front of Mr. Purita’s adjacent D’Latte at 218 Main St. to keep customers at outdoor tables from moving outward and blocking access to the sidewalk, which is already compromised by a large tree on village property.

Also, Rena Wilhelm got quick approval for sign designs at her new White Weathered Barn Lifestyle Boutique at 213 Front St. In line with a recently enacted resolution giving merchants the opportunity to use overhanging signs, Ms. Wilhelm will now need Planning Board approval to hang one.

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