Our executive editor’s favorite Suffolk Times photos from 2016

12/30/2016 5:57 AM |

What makes a great photo? Ask 10 different journalists and you’ll get 10 different answers. 

Personally, I love to see a photograph that tells a story. Sometimes that conveys exactly what the written story is about. Or maybe it’s a picture revealing something that could never be captured in words.

In reviewing this year’s papers for our Year in Review issue, I selected the following photos as my favorites of the year, primarily for those reasons.

The captions explain what I saw in each of these photos.

There’s something about seeing a cardinal in the snow that just adds to the bird’s beauty. This January photo from Katharine Schroeder was my favorite art shot of the year. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

There’s something about seeing a cardinal in the snow that just adds to the bird’s beauty. This January photo from Katharine Schroeder was my favorite art shot of the year. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

Seeing Cinnie, a 10-year-old dog that had been in the Southold Animal Shelter longer than any other, breathe in the air and feel the rain drops on her trip to her forever home in Morristown, Pa. was incredibly moving. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

Seeing Cinnie, a 10-year-old dog that had been in the Southold Animal Shelter longer than any other, breathe in the air and feel the rain drops on her trip to her forever home in Morristown, Pa. was incredibly moving. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

This was my favorite portrait of the year. It’s a shot of a smiling Dan McCarthy, assistant archivist at the Southold Historical Society. Here he is documenting time on the North Fork and he’s juxtaposed next to a clock. Perfect. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

This was my favorite portrait of the year. It’s a shot of a smiling Dan McCarthy, assistant archivist at the Southold Historical Society. Here he is documenting time on the North Fork and he’s juxtaposed next to a clock. Perfect. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTOAn osprey watches the sun rise at the waterfront in New Suffolk.

Every year I get a handful of both sunrise and osprey photos submitted to me. It can get a bit redundant. Here we have both together in a rare and stunning scene. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

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Captain Bob Hamilton of Greenport fishing in Gardiners Bay aboard his boat, the “Jeremy H,” which is named for his late son. The photo, which was taken by his other son, Chris, was the winner of our #nofostateofmind Instagram contest. The colors give it a very modern feel, but it’s also a classic North Fork shot that ran on one of our best front pages of 2016. (Credit: Chris Hamilton)

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTOBill and Stephanie Zuhoski at their home in Mattituck.

Our follow up on ‘Miracle on the Hudson’ passenger Bill Zuhoski was meant to be an update on someone who survived this major news event. It ended up reading like a bit of a love story and the look on his wife Stephanie’s face says it all. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

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After 41 years in the jewelry business — 31 of them as owner of Robert’s Jewelers in Southold — Robert Scott is retiring next month. This beautifully lit portrait shows him in action and also captures his trademark look so perfectly. (Credit: Krysten Massa)

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The only of my own photos I selected, was snapped just before the sun dipped into the bay the night El Galeon arrived in Greenport. Recognizing how late the ship would arrive in the harbor, we rushed out on a boat to beat the sunset and capture the tall ship as it made its way into Plum Gut. (Credit: Grant Parpan)

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It’s so hard when covering an event to capture an actual moment of celebration. This frame, I assume showing father and son, was perfectly timed during Shellabration in Greenport. (Credit: Jeremy Garretson)

PAUL SQUIRE PHOTO

Jim Thompsen (left) and Jack Tandy have been co-workers for years at The Home Depot in Riverhead. Earlier this year, Mr. Tandy donated his dying son’s kidney to Mr. Thompsen as a way to honor what he believed his son — local veteran Joseph Tandy — would have wanted. It gets a little dusty every time I see this photo. (Credit: Paul Squire)

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