09/06/14 8:00am
09/06/2014 8:00 AM
Helicopter traffic at East Hampton Airport cannot be curtailed at the moment, since the FAA contributed money toward infrastructure improvements there, and FAA rules prohibit any discrimination against certain types of aircraft. (Credit: Kyril Bromley/The East Hampton Press)

Helicopter traffic at East Hampton Airport cannot be curtailed at the moment, since the FAA contributed money toward infrastructure improvements there, and FAA rules prohibit any discrimination against certain types of aircraft. (Credit: Kyril Bromley/The East Hampton Press)

Joe Werkmeister’s column last week seemingly downplaying the impact of helicopter noise on the North Fork was an interesting take on the subject. I’m sure that he’s not the only person in town who doesn’t understand the impact helicopter noise can have on the neighborhoods directly under the flight path. (more…)

09/05/14 1:00pm
09/05/2014 1:00 PM
(Credit: Grant Parpan)

The view behind Latham’s farm stand in Orient. (Credit: Grant Parpan)

That rumbling you hear coming from out east is the sound of restless natives concerned about the future of one of the most iconic vistas on the East End — the one surrounding and behind Latham’s farm stand on the south side of Main Road in Orient. It represents the first view of Orient Harbor (and Shelter Island beyond) as you travel west through the hamlet, and the last view of the harbor as you travel east over the Orient-East Marion Causeway. (more…)

09/04/14 5:00am
09/04/2014 5:00 AM
Two of four buildings that house six numbered apartments at the Cutchogue business property where town officials say people are living illegally. Residents there, who pay more than $1,000 a month, say they can't afford anywhere else.

Two of four buildings that house six numbered apartments at the Cutchogue business property where town officials say people are living illegally. Residents there, who pay more than $1,000 a month, say they can’t afford to live anywhere else in town.

To the editor:

It is indeed important that Southold Town take steps to promote affordable housing. Long Island is in the throes of a serious housing crisis, as a Regional Plan Association report found in 2013. Without affordable rental housing, the report warned, businesses will not stay in the area and the economy will stagnate. (more…)

08/30/14 8:00am
08/30/2014 8:00 AM
A seaplane flies over Mattituck Aug. 22, one of several aircraft observed over a three-hour period. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

A seaplane flies over Mattituck Aug. 22, one of several aircraft observed over a three-hour period that night. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

Three hours into an exhaustive stakeout to document the greatest threat to North Fork life — helicopter noise — I reached an inauspicious conclusion: On this night in Mattituck, the loudest noise was neither helicopter, seaplane, nor any other flying craft that pollutes our precious skies.  (more…)

08/29/14 7:00am
08/29/2014 7:00 AM
Two of four buildings that house six numbered apartments at the Cutchogue business property where town officials say people are living illegally. Residents there, who pay more than $1,000 a month, say they can't afford anywhere else.

Two of four buildings that house six numbered apartments at the Cutchogue business property where town officials say people are living illegally. Residents there, who pay more than $1,000 a month, say they can’t afford to live anywhere else in town.

The Southold Town Board approved zoning changes this week that could lead to the building of higher density affordable housing complexes within the town. At least, on paper that could happen. The realities of economics and infrastructure were quickly noted. Specifically, Supervisor Scott Russell pointed out Tuesday that affordable housing complexes are often economically infeasible, even when developers are offered grant money. The town’s lack of sewer systems also poses a roadblock to such projects.

(more…)

08/28/14 6:00am
08/28/2014 6:00 AM
Rhode Island lawmakers were moved to act to restore water quality in area bays after thousands of juvenile fish turned up dead in Greenwich Bay on Aug. 20, 2003. Algal blooms were blamed for the kill. (Credit: Tom Ardito)

Rhode Island lawmakers were moved to act to restore water quality in area bays after thousands of juvenile fish turned up dead in Greenwich Bay on Aug. 20, 2003. Algal blooms were blamed for the kill. (Credit: Tom Ardito)

To the editor:

Last week, The Suffolk Times ran a long article on water issues and nitrogen. Thank you.

So what are we waiting for? We have known about this problem for a long time. It isn’t going away and it will only get worse as the years roll by. (more…)