09/30/10 5:35pm
09/30/2010 5:35 PM

The countdown is running on a series of public hearings on noise, deer fences and parking in Southold Town.

Three hearings are set for Tuesday, Oct. 5, beginning just after 7:30 p.m. The first, and perhaps the most controversial, will be on the Town Board’s proposal for the first-ever Southold noise ordinance.

The proposal would limit noise to 65 decibels at the noise-maker’s property line between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Noise outside those hours would not be allowed to exceed 50 decibels.

Aimed at curbing loud amplified music, the law would exempt construction noise, church bells, snowblowers, outdoor residential equipment, agricultural equipment, non-amplified noise from athletic events, legal fireworks displays and fire engines responding to calls.

Violators would pay a fine not to exceed $500 after conviction on a first offense, and a fine not to exceed $5,000 after conviction for a third violation within 18 months.

Some residents have expressed concern over the past several weeks that the penalties could be negotiated down from the fees listed in the law, while others have said that the law would be too restrictive for live music events.

The second public hearing, immediately after the noise law hearing is concluded, will be on a law that would allow eight-foot deer fences on residential and commercial properties. Currently, the town allows deer fences only on agricultural properties, but as the deer population has exploded, many people have found that the animals are ruining their gardens and landscaping as well as leaving behind disease-carrying ticks.

The proposal would require that fences be made of woven wire fence fabric instead of wood or other materials that are more visually obstructive. It would allow fences only along the side and rear yards of properties and across side yards at the rear of houses to create backyard enclosures.

The third hearing will be on a proposal to limit parking at the end of Mill Lane, on the west side of Goldsmith Inlet in Peconic, after a summer in which nearby residents say their streets were overflowing with cars on sunny days. They belonged to people who do not have town beach parking stickers and so cannot park in the town lot at the end of the road.

If adopted, the law would require town permits for cars parked between the road end at the beach and Second Avenue. No parking would be allowed between Second and Miami avenues.

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09/30/10 5:30pm

The Village Market has been a fixture on Love Lane in Mattituck since 1896, but when the market’s doors close on Sept. 30, it will be the end of an era.

Mike Bourguignon has owned The Village Market, which serves breakfast and lunch specials, sells groceries and has a full deli with counter seating, for 22 years. In the past year, at his wife’s suggestion, he began quietly seeking a buyer for the business.

He found one right next door. Michael Avella, who owns The Love Lane Kitchen, is in contract to buy The Village Market, which he plans to turn into a specialty grocery store before Christmas. Both men expect the closing to be within the week.

Mr. Avella said he was excited by what he plans to continue the counter seating offered at The Village Market.

“People can expect a butcher, a baker, a fish monger, produce that will be almost exclusively local, high quality imported goods,” he said. “We’ll also have pastries, gelato, a coffee station and we plan to make our own doughnuts. It’s all in the design phase right now.”

Mr. Bourguignon was grinning from ear to ear Saturday night, when the market’s cook, Judy Thilberg, threw a surprise going away party for him at the market. It seemed as if everyone in Mattituck had crammed inside to say goodbye.

Mr. Bourguignon had worked at several delis throughout Long Island before he heard in 1988 from friends who owned a similar market in Quogue that The Village Market was for sale. When he first visited and saw the regulars hanging out in the deli, trading stories in the early morning or having a quick bite on their lunch breaks, he knew it was a place he wanted.

“This was always the place to be,” he said, as he stood surrounded Saturday night by a group of regular customers who were gently chiding him and reminiscing about their visits to the market.

“What am I going to miss? It’s obvious. All these knuckleheads,” he said.

Ms. Thilberg and the butcher, Mario Zulli, had both been on the staff when Mr. Bourguignon bought the market from Vicki McDowell and Marilyn Gatz.

Both Ms. Thilberg and Mr. Bourguignon said that they would take advantage of their new free time to travel. Ms. Thilberg plans to continue working at her brother’s auto body shop, Sap Enterprises, in Riverhead.

“The best part of the job was meeting all the interesting people over the years,” she said. “We’ll miss everybody.”

Ms. Thilberg’s sister, Carol Underwood, was already missing the market as she sampled her sister’s cooking at the party.

“I’m going to miss the chicken salad,” she said. “Judy is like a pillar.”

Ms. Underwood’s husband, Jim Underwood, was also feeling nostalgic. Just retired from his job as a health teacher at Mattituck High School a few blocks away, he came to The Village Market for lunch nearly every day during school.

“I’m going to miss their sausage and the news updates from people you’d see,” he said. “This place was like Mattituck online, but you didn’t need the Internet. This has been community home base. There’s going to be a big gap.”

Mr. Underwood said that when he returned to school with food to go the plates would be heaping. The crab cakes and lemon chicken were his favorites.

“I tried to make the lemon chicken. Judy told me how, but I couldn’t duplicate it,” he said.

Lisa Davis, who said she works not far from The Village Market, has been a regular for 22 years. “I wouldn’t miss their egg special on Saturday mornings,” she said. “It has a down-home, friendly feeling. They knew everybody. It’s going to be a big hole.”

Danielle Grathwohl’s first job was at The Village Market, when she was 14. That was before Mr. Bourguignon owned the market, and “he made it better,” she said. She worked as a cashier and, when it was slow, she made chopped meat.

“My mom said, ‘Work some place you can walk to,'” she said.

“My husband’s here every day with my children. Judy would give them cookies, so she became the cookie lady. My daughter was Little Miss Mattituck and she had her picture taken with Mike on the counter,” Ms. Grathwohl added.

Ms. Grathwohl said that she doesn’t know where she and her family will go for cookies and home cooking now that The Village Market is closing.

“It’s really the end of an era,” she said.

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09/30/10 5:27pm

Residents of Browns Hills in Orient are hopping mad at the Suffolk County Water Authority, which has proposed tripling what it charge tro manage their small public water system since its plan to bring a pipeline to Orient was shot down.

The water authority held a public hearing on the proposed increase, from $495 to $1,500 per month, at its Southold headquarters on Boisseau Avenue Friday night. About 50 residents attended and about a dozen spoke, angrily denouncing the rate proposal.

Browns Hills resident Venetia Hands chastised the water authority for wanting to charge residents “allocated costs” that included administration and infrastructure costs for the entire SCWA water system.

Ms. Hands prepared a financial breakdown of the costs of the system, which she calculated on large sheets of paper that she taped to the wall of the water authority’s headquarters. Business experts had told her, “Venetia, you’d be paying this if Browns Hills blew up tomorrow,” she said of the costs, which she said should be shared among all of the water authority’s 395,000 ratepayers countywide. She said that if the costs were reallocated over the entire ratepayer base, it would cost each SCWA customer an additional 16 cents per year.

Breaking down the costs of the Browns Hills system, water authority chief financial officer Larry Kulick said that water filters at each of the 24 houses in Browns Hills cost $370 a year to maintain, and that the water authority spends another $21,000, on average, running 380 different tests on the water every quarter. He said that testing alone costs $875 per household per year.

Mr. Kulick added that the SCWA has long subsidized the Browns Hills system and the proposed higher rates reflected the real costs. The increased fee, he said, included a hike in the levy for maintaining the system’s infrastructure, from $295 to $1,245 for each household, and an increase in the cost to deliver the water, from $200 to $255 per year for each.

Another speaker was William Ryall, who built a house in Browns Hills in 2000. At that time, he dug a well for a geothermal heating system, but connected to the local system for his drinking water. He took two glass bottles of water out of a backpack and placed them in front of the water authority board’s chairman, Jim Gaughran.

One bottle, Mr. Ryall said, contained water from his tap, and the other water from his geothermal well. He said he’d had the water samples tested last fall, and said the water from the tap connected to the SCWA well, which is under a farm field, contained 12.6 parts per million of nitrates, while the water from the geothermal well had 4 parts per million of nitrates. Ten parts per million is the accepted standard.

“I’m told that’s the equivalent of eating one hot dog per month. My water is pure enough. It doesn’t need to be filtered,” he said.

For the next two weeks, the SCWA will accept written comments addressed to its headquarters at 4060 Sunrise Highway, Oakdale, NY 11769 or [email protected] Members of the water authority’s board said that the earliest a decision on the rates would be made would be at their October meeting.

Mr. Gaughran said the board is waiting to hear from the New York State Environmental Facilities Corporation on a plan to re-route the rejected water main once slated for Orient to another community in Calverton. The Environmental Facilities Corporation was responsible for directing $1.9 million in federal stimulus money to the Orient water main project. He said the scope of the Calverton project would not be determined until the water authority receives feedback on whether some of the money must be used in Orient.

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09/30/10 12:00am

SOUTHOLD PECONIC SENIORS

Our Sept. 9 meeting, the first of the new year, was beset with a few problems. Who would make the coffee? Who would take over Paula Johnson’s job as recreation person and what would my program be?

I thought I would get Harold Schwerdt, Pat Guiney and Joe Kozel to sing. Harold had not arrived, Pat had cataract surgery the previous day and where were the Kozels? Well, Harold was singing at a funeral Mass, Pat was at the doctor and the Kozels came in late from the dentist. So we went back to grade school and told what we did during the summer. Many of us picnicked and played bocce. Marie Kozel was visited by family, including a 2-year-old great-grandson who came to visit from Florida. Also, granddaughter Heather became engaged and will be married soon.

President Ned Micelli, seasoned traveler, went to London not to see the green but to meet daughter Laura’s prospective in-laws, and he and Sue continued cruising up north to Copenhagen. Observation was that Scotland had hardly any trees and the trip was a virtual cocktail party. They had a great time.

Jack Hearn had major surgery that turned out fine, but thank goodness he did not pull a Lyndon Johnson and show everybody his scar.

Dolores Byroff told a sweet story about a brother coming back to his faith.

Marion Kruszeksi, Flo Ostroski and Norma Slavonik will happily take care of the luncheon for the next few months, and a voice rang out — that of Marty Frey — saying, “I’ll do the coffee.” All was well except that my right knee, which I had intended taking to my grave, will be replaced next week. I am outraged and scared silly.

We are all happy; our bingo prizes have come up to $17 or $18 and we all pray that our boys and girls overseas will come home soon and we will really cut as loose as a group of seniors can.

CLAIRE FOOS

09/30/10 12:00am

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO
Southold is slated to purchase the development rights on more than eight acres of land at the Flora Nurseries on Wickham Avenue in Mattituck, but critics worry that the town will set a bad precedent by preserving land that already has greenhouses on it.

Southold Town’s plan to preserve 8.26 acres owned by Flora Nurseries on Wickham Road in Mattituck by buying the development rights for more than half a million dollars has met with some resistance because part of the property is covered by greenhouses.

At an Aug. 24 public hearing on the acquisition, two farmers on the Town Board spoke passionately in favor of approving the purchase. But Councilman Chris Talbot read a letter from Long Island Pine Barrens Society president Richard Amper rebuking the town for planning to use Community Preservation Fund (CPF) money to save land that already is developed. Board members tabled a vote on the purchase, citing concerns to be raised with the town’s planning department and land preservation committee.

Southold Supervisor Scott Russell said that a fraction of the property, only about 16,000 square feet, is covered by greenhouses, well within the threshold for preserved land.

But in his letter, Mr. Amper said that his group had been complaining for three years about Suffolk County’s practice of buying the development rights to land on which “industrial agriculture” was practiced. He said he was concerned that Southold was following the county’s lead.

“It was never an agricultural subsidy act,” he said of the state law that authorized the creation in all five East End towns of a local CPF, adding that the public is unlikely to continue to support the land preservation program if it is used to subsidize agricultural businesses instead of preserving open lands.

He added that approval of the proposed purchase would constitute “a gift of public wealth without public benefit.” He urged that the town drop the property from its CPF priority list and review the status of the rest of the 1,200 prime agricultural acres in town that are considered eligible for preservation.

The town was planning to pay $63,000 an acre for a development rights easement on 8.26 acres of a 10.1-acre parcel, which is held by a company known as 6900 Wickham Avenue LLC. The LLC is controlled by beefsteak tomato farmer Richard Girard.

“He probably produces more tomatoes from that small farm than all the tomatoes grown on the North Fork these days,” Mr. Russell said. “When we talk about words like sustainability, we need to mean it. … The greenhouses may look enormous, but on the totality, they don’t cover more than 20 percent of this property.”

Councilman Bill Ruland, a farmer, said the property is bordered on three sides by protected land. “It would be imprudent for the Town Board to let this go to development,” he said. “They produce food year round … As this country goes on, more and more food will be grown this way.”

“It is a key parcel in a pretty large block of land where the development rights have been protected,” added Councilman Al Krupski, also a farmer. “Today there’s greenhouses there. In 50 years, who knows what will be there. If this land is protected, it will be in agriculture.”

A vote on the acquisition had been scheduled for the Town Board’s Sept. 21 meeting, but was tabled.

Town attorney Martin Finnegan said this week that the board is awaiting feedback from planning director Heather Lanza, who has been out on leave, before going ahead with the vote.

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09/30/10 12:00am

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO
Cara Wells of Southold gives an impassioned account of her numerous bouts with tick-borne illness at Tuesday night’s forum on deer management at the town recreation center in Peconic.

Southold’s burgeoning deer population is much more than a nuisance; it’s a health crisis.

Many of the nearly 100 people who packed the house at a forum on deer management sponsored by the town Tuesday night said they’d contracted at least one of a number of deer tick-borne diseases.

Cara Wells just finished a 28-day Doxycycline dosing for Lyme disease and has suffered from numerous tick-borne diseases since the day she moved to Southold in 2002.

“I would happily volunteer for a human Frontline trial,” she said during the gathering at the town recreation center in Peconic. “I’m a tick magnet. They love me. I keep DEET in my car. I spray it on myself constantly. What’s worse, the DEET or the dox?”

Justine Gilvarry said a friend researching the health problem documented people who’d lost their spleens and children whose faces had been paralyzed because of complications from tick-borne diseases.

John Woods of Peconic said he had had Lyme disease twice and recently hit a deer with his car. He estimated that he spends $3,000 per year to protect himself from deer, which are prime hosts for ticks.

“I’m thrown by the fact that they’re no longer afraid of us,” he said of local deer. “It’s getting to be almost an out-of-control problem.”

Wildlife scientist John Rasweiler added that he is concerned that a large deer population could spread far more diseases and parasites than just the omnipresent Lyme disease.

“I look at our deer population and all kinds of flags go up,” he said. “The whole story of West Nile virus … this can very easily happen again and here we have a wildlife population that could serve as a reservoir for this kind of disease.”

He estimated that there are about 10,000 deer in Southold, and last year hunters killed only 462. He added that most deer produce two or three young a year.

“If we don’t humanely cull the herd, nature is going to take its course,” he said. “Sooner or later, they’re going to die off either of disease or hunger.”

Southold Town, which has begun to promote nuisance hunting with special state permits to thin the herd, this year agreed to lease a refrigerator truck for hunters to store venison to be donated as food to Long Island Cares.

Michael Clark, who oversees deer management for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, said he is pushing the state to allow hunting with a bow and arrow closer than the current 500 feet from a house now set as a minimum. He believes that bow and arrow hunting should be permitted within 200 feet of houses, which he said would dramatically increase the amount of land people could hunt with nuisance permits. State Assemblyman Mark Alessi, who attended the forum, said he plans to introduce legislation to decrease the bow hunting restriction to 250 feet.

Mr. Clark added that under the nuisance permit program, homeowners have the ultimate control over who can hunt and when on their land.

He said he was looking for butchers on the East End who were willing to help process venison caught by hunters who donate the meat, because the only venison processors on Long Island are in Oakdale and Farmingville. The state pays $1.50 a pound for their services.

“If you know a person who likes to cut up meat, put them in touch with me,” he said.

Town Supervisor Scott Russell said he’d received many e-mails and phone calls imploring him to consider using contraception on deer. But New York State, which views venison as a fundamental food source, will not allow contraceptive chemicals in game meat. He also said the town had been dealing with people defacing and destroying hunting area signs since town workers began putting them up this month. He added that he often gets calls from the people who oppose hunting saying they are also opposed to deer fences.

“Folks, it’s getting to a point where we have to make decisions,” he said. “We can’t have open farmland and a robust deer herd.”

Joe Gergela, president of the Long Island Farm Bureau, said deer have dramatically changed farming to the point where expensive deer fences are necessary to ensure that farmers don’t lose their crops.

“We’ve seen deer digging potatoes with their hooves in the Hallockville area,” he said.

The town invited Lee Humberg, who works for the USDA’s Wildlife Services, to the forum to describe the services his agency offers. Mr. Humberg cautioned that the use of USDA hunting teams, who charge between $1,500 and $2,500 for a night’s work, must be done in conjunction with other management programs to be a cost-effective solution.

“The government gives us enough money to keep the lights on. The rest of our budget comes from service fees,” he said, adding that, on a good night in a well-placed location, the USDA’s hunting teams can take out 50 deer.

“If in the town of Southold there are 10,000 deer, I’m not going to solve your problem,” he said.

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09/30/10 12:00am

The countdown is running on a series of public hearings on noise, deer fences and parking in Southold Town.

Three hearings are set for Tuesday, Oct. 5, beginning just after 7:30 p.m. The first, and perhaps the most controversial, will be on the Town Board’s proposal for the first-ever Southold noise ordinance.

The proposal would limit noise to 65 decibels at the noise-maker’s property line between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Noise outside those hours would not be allowed to exceed 50 decibels.

Aimed at curbing loud amplified music, the law would exempt construction noise, church bells, snowblowers, outdoor residential equipment, agricultural equipment, non-amplified noise from athletic events, legal fireworks displays and fire engines responding to calls.

Violators would pay a fine not to exceed $500 after conviction on a first offense, and a fine not to exceed $5,000 after conviction for a third violation within 18 months.

Some residents have expressed concern over the past several weeks that the penalties could be negotiated down from the fees listed in the law, while others have said that the law would be too restrictive for live music events.

The second public hearing, immediately after the noise law hearing is concluded, will be on a law that would allow eight-foot deer fences on residential and commercial properties. Currently, the town allows deer fences only on agricultural properties, but as the deer population has exploded, many people have found that the animals are ruining their gardens and landscaping as well as leaving behind disease-carrying ticks.

The proposal would require that fences be made of woven wire fence fabric instead of wood or other materials that are more visually obstructive. It would allow fences only along the side and rear yards of properties and across side yards at the rear of houses to create backyard enclosures.

The third hearing will be on a proposal to limit parking at the end of Mill Lane, on the west side of Goldsmith Inlet in Peconic, after a summer in which nearby residents say their streets were overflowing with cars on sunny days. They belonged to people who do not have town beach parking stickers and so cannot park in the town lot at the end of the road.

If adopted, the law would require town permits for cars parked between the road end at the beach and Second Avenue. No parking would be allowed between Second and Miami avenues.

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09/30/10 12:00am

“There are so many ways to adore you, cauliflower. I love you for your delicious, crumbly gratins baked for an hour in the oven on Friday evenings. I love your Monday night soups quickly whirled together and laced with mushrooms and herbes de Provence. I love your lazy Sunday afternoon curries served with coconut rice. But I think best of all I love you slow-roasted at 350 degrees for about an hour.”

Nicole Spiridakis

“Cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education.”

Mark Twain

Cauliflower is part of the vegetable family that includes cabbage, Brussels sprouts, kale, broccoli and collard greens. These are all robust fall vegetables that are full of flavor and nutrition. They are high in dietary fiber and vitamin C and also contain several phytochemicals that are beneficial to human health, including the anti-cancer compound sulforaphane.

Choosing the right cooking method is important with cauliflower because when not handled properly it can be strong tasting or mushy and lose much of its nutritional value. Roasting, stir-frying, blanching and just eating it raw are the best methods, while long cooking in boiling water is the worst. Cauliflower is very adaptable in the way it accepts seasonings and pairs well with other vegetables and starches. It is also good when pickled. Here are some suggestions:

Roasted Cauliflower with Pumpkin and Chickpeas

Cut one head of cauliflower into small florets. Cut a small Long Island cheese pumpkin into wedges and peel off the skin, removing seeds. Cut the wedges into 1-inch chunks and set aside.

Heat a sautà pan and add 1/4 cup olive oil. Add to this 1 tablespoon sliced garlic, 2 teaspoons minced ginger, 1 tablespoon curry powder, 1 teaspoon turmeric, 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes and 1 teaspoon coarse salt. Cook for 1 minute and add 1 thinly sliced onion. Cook for 3 minutes and transfer to a large bowl. Add the cauliflower florets and pumpkin and toss with the seasonings and oil. Place this on a sheet pan and roast in a 400-degree oven until tender and brown, about 25 minutes. Add 2 small cans of drained and rinsed chickpeas (garbanzo beans) and roast another 5 minutes. Transfer to a large serving bowl and serve with grilled chicken or other grilled foods.

Serves 4-6.

Potato and Cauliflower Pie

Peel and cut 1 pound of potatoes into large chunks. Place them in boiling water and cook until tender. Drain and mash. Add 1/2 cup chopped scallion, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Stir in seasonings and press mixture into a 10-inch glass pie plate (or similar casserole), using a rubber spatula to press potato against the sides. Bake in a 375-degree oven for 25 minutes.

Meanwhile, cut one head of cauliflower into small florets. Bring 2 quarts of water to a boil and add 1 teaspoon salt and the juice of one lemon. Add the cauliflower and cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain and mash the cauliflower with a potato masher.

In a separate pan melt 3 tablespoons butter and add 1 cup chopped onion, 1 tablespoon minced garlic and a minced jalapeno pepper (seeds removed). Sautà briefly and stir in 3 cups rinsed and trimmed kale, cut into 1-inch pieces. Cover the pan and cook until kale is wilted, about 3 minutes. Add this mixture to the mashed cauliflower and stir in one beaten egg. Add salt and pepper to taste and spread over baked potato crust in pie pan. Grate 2 cups of Gruyîre cheese and sprinkle over the cauliflower mixture. Return to the oven and cook until cheese melts, about 20 minutes.

Serves 4-6.

Cauliflower Gratin

Cut 1 head of cauliflower into small florets. Bring 2 quarts of water to a boil, add 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 teaspoon salt and the cauliflower. Cook until cauliflower is just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain and place in a casserole dish.

Melt 4 tablespoons butter in a saucepan and add 1/4 cup flour. Cook for 2 minutes and whisk in 2 cups milk. Cook slowly until sauce thickens and stir in 1/4 cup prepared horseradish and 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Season with 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Grate 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg into it and pour sauce over the cauliflower. Sprinkle 1 cup grated white cheddar cheese over the top. Heat 2 tablespoons butter in a sautà pan and add 1 cup panko crumbs. Stir until they begin to brown, then sprinkle over casserole. Place in a 350-degree oven and cook, uncovered, for 25 minutes, or until brown and bubbly.

Serves 4.

Cauliflower and Leek Soup

Melt 4 tablespoons butter in a soup pot and add 3 finely chopped leeks (white part only) and 1 cup chopped onion. Stir in 1 tablespoon of fresh thyme leaves and cook slowly until onions are soft. Stir in 1/4 cup flour and continue cooking for 3 minutes. Gradually stir in 4 cups of chicken broth and bring to a boil. Add 1 head of cauliflower that has been cut into 1-inch florets (about 6 cups). Simmer for 30 minutes, or until cauliflower is tender. Add 1 cup heavy cream and season with 1 teaspoon coarse salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg. Check for seasoning and serve.

Makes 6-8 servings.

Pickled Cauliflower, Carrots and White Onions

Cut one head of cauliflower into small florets. Peel and cut 4 carrots into bite-sized pieces. Bring 1 quart of water to a boil in a large saucepan and plunge 18 white onions into the water for 1 minute. Drain and peel.

Dry out the pan and place it back on the heat, adding 1 teaspoon mustard seed and 1 teaspoon fennel seed. When the seeds are toasted (about 3 minutes) add 2 cups water and 2 cups white wine vinegar. Stir in 6 tablespoons sugar and season with 4 bay leaves, 1 tablespoon coarse salt and 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes. Bring to a boil and add the carrots. Cook for 2 minutes and add the onions. Cook for 2 minutes and add the cauliflower. Cover and cook for 2 more minutes and remove from the stove. Place in a bowl to cool. Chill in the refrigerator and serve as an hors d’oeuvre.

Serves 4-8.

John Ross, a chef and author, has been an active part of the North Fork food and wine community for more than 35 years. E-mail: [email protected]

09/30/10 12:00am

BETH YOUNG PHOTO
Regulars at The Village Market on Love Lane in Mattituck wish owner Mike Bourguignon good luck at a going-away party Saturday night. The shop will close Sept. 30. The owners of Love Lane Kitchen next door have purchased the property and plan to open a gourmet food store.

The Village Market has been a fixture on Love Lane in Mattituck since 1896, but when the market’s doors close on Sept. 30, it will be the end of an era.

Mike Bourguignon has owned The Village Market, which serves breakfast and lunch specials, sells groceries and has a full deli with counter seating, for 22 years. In the past year, at his wife’s suggestion, he began quietly seeking a buyer for the business.

He found one right next door. Michael Avella, who owns The Love Lane Kitchen, is in contract to buy The Village Market, which he plans to turn into a specialty grocery store before Christmas. Both men expect the closing to be within the week.

Mr. Avella said he was excited by what he plans to continue the counter seating offered at The Village Market.

“People can expect a butcher, a baker, a fish monger, produce that will be almost exclusively local, high quality imported goods,” he said. “We’ll also have pastries, gelato, a coffee station and we plan to make our own doughnuts. It’s all in the design phase right now.”

Mr. Bourguignon was grinning from ear to ear Saturday night, when the market’s cook, Judy Thilberg, threw a surprise going away party for him at the market. It seemed as if everyone in Mattituck had crammed inside to say goodbye.

Mr. Bourguignon had worked at several delis throughout Long Island before he heard in 1988 from friends who owned a similar market in Quogue that The Village Market was for sale. When he first visited and saw the regulars hanging out in the deli, trading stories in the early morning or having a quick bite on their lunch breaks, he knew it was a place he wanted.

“This was always the place to be,” he said, as he stood surrounded Saturday night by a group of regular customers who were gently chiding him and reminiscing about their visits to the market.

“What am I going to miss? It’s obvious. All these knuckleheads,” he said.

Ms. Thilberg and the butcher, Mario Zulli, had both been on the staff when Mr. Bourguignon bought the market from Vicki McDowell and Marilyn Gatz.

Both Ms. Thilberg and Mr. Bourguignon said that they would take advantage of their new free time to travel. Ms. Thilberg plans to continue working at her brother’s auto body shop, Sap Enterprises, in Riverhead.

“The best part of the job was meeting all the interesting people over the years,” she said. “We’ll miss everybody.”

Ms. Thilberg’s sister, Carol Underwood, was already missing the market as she sampled her sister’s cooking at the party.

“I’m going to miss the chicken salad,” she said. “Judy is like a pillar.”

Ms. Underwood’s husband, Jim Underwood, was also feeling nostalgic. Just retired from his job as a health teacher at Mattituck High School a few blocks away, he came to The Village Market for lunch nearly every day during school.

“I’m going to miss their sausage and the news updates from people you’d see,” he said. “This place was like Mattituck online, but you didn’t need the Internet. This has been community home base. There’s going to be a big gap.”

Mr. Underwood said that when he returned to school with food to go the plates would be heaping. The crab cakes and lemon chicken were his favorites.

“I tried to make the lemon chicken. Judy told me how, but I couldn’t duplicate it,” he said.

Lisa Davis, who said she works not far from The Village Market, has been a regular for 22 years. “I wouldn’t miss their egg special on Saturday mornings,” she said. “It has a down-home, friendly feeling. They knew everybody. It’s going to be a big hole.”

Danielle Grathwohl’s first job was at The Village Market, when she was 14. That was before Mr. Bourguignon owned the market, and “he made it better,” she said. She worked as a cashier and, when it was slow, she made chopped meat.

“My mom said, ‘Work some place you can walk to,'” she said.

“My husband’s here every day with my children. Judy would give them cookies, so she became the cookie lady. My daughter was Little Miss Mattituck and she had her picture taken with Mike on the counter,” Ms. Grathwohl added.

Ms. Grathwohl said that she doesn’t know where she and her family will go for cookies and home cooking now that The Village Market is closing.

“It’s really the end of an era,” she said.

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09/30/10 12:00am

RIVERHEAD CARE CENTER COURTESY PHOTO

Owners: Riverhead Care Center LLC

Year established: 1968

Location: 1146 Woodcrest Ave., Riverhead

Phone: 631-727-4400

Number of employees: 190

Riverhead Care Center is committed to providing excellence in both 24-hour skilled nursing long-term care and short-term rehabilitation and subacute care, according to administrator Mary Ann Mangels.

Its state-of-the art rehabilitation center offers physical, occupational and speech therapy. “Our focus is on independence, mobility and recovery in a creative, relaxed, well-oriented environment,” said Ms. Mangels.

Residents enjoy a complete range of stimulating programs and activities. “We treat all of our residents like family because our philosophy is, ‘We are a family,’â” she added.

Riverhead Care Center recently received the IPRO Quality Award for safe patient handling, making it one of only 17 facilities in New York State to receive the honor. “As part of our patient safety program, we use the newest safe patient handling technology and lift equipment in our Zero Manual Lift program. This ensures added safety for both our residents and our staff,” Ms. Mangles explained.

It’s also the only subacute rehabilitation facility on the East End to offer Cardiac Telemetry Monitoring Therapy, which enables patients to benefit from continuous telemetry monitoring while undergoing therapy. Candidates for the program can include those with valve replacements, coronary artery bypass grafts and arrhythmia, including those with atrial fibrillation, syncopal episodes and congestive heart failure.

Riverhead Care Center is both Medicare- and Medicaid-certified, and participates in a variety of HMO plans, including Empire Blue Cross/Blue Shield.

Visit Riverhead Care Center online at riverheadcarecenter.com or schedule an appointment to visit the facility in person.