04/21/14 7:51pm
04/21/2014 7:51 PM
Greenport-Maritime-Festival-chowder-contest

A Mano’s chef Tom Schaudel accepts the trophy for Best in Show from chef John Ross as judge Paula Croteau looks on at the 2010 Maritime Festival. (Credit: Jay Webster, file)

Maritime Festival organizers are making good on their promise to bring back the popular chowder contest to Greenport this year — but it won’t happen during the village’s annual festival in September.  (more…)

09/19/13 12:00pm
09/19/2013 12:00 PM

KATHARINE SCHROEDER FILE PHOTO | The crew from the Blue Canoe giving out samples of their chowder during last year’s festival.

Despite a valiant effort by the Greenport Farmers’ Market, the chowder contest won’t be making a return to this year’s Maritime Festival in Greenport.

With the blessing of festival organizers, manager KiKi Hurst rushed to confirm enough contestants after a grassroots effort to bring back the contest. But putting the pieces back together in just over a week before the festival proved unfeasible.

“Everyone was so interested it just came down to logistics,” Ms. Hurst said. “When the contest was called off restaurants picked up other things instead. They just didn’t have enough man power.”

Ms. Hurst said she and fellow residents were inspired to bring back the long-running competition after the East End Seaport Museum decided to replace it with an oyster shucking event for the first time this year.

Last month, Seaport Museum chairman Ron Breuer said the move was not only an effort to better reflect Greenport’s legacy as an oystering community, but also because of the burdensome preparations of organizing the contest. Participating restaurants were responsible for preparing up to 25 gallons of chowder each, not to mention delivering and properly heating it during the contest, Mr. Breuer said.

Establishing a space and covering the expense of renting tents to house the competition was also problematic.

Ms. Hurst said the Farmers’ Market already has lot of the necessary elements needed to host the contest, such as tables and tents. Time, however, was not on their side.

“The Farmer’s Market made a very strong effort,” Mr. Breuer said. “It looks like it will be an event next year.”

Both Ms. Hurst and Mr. Breuer said they fully intend to bring back the chowder competition for future festivals.

“It’s a good fundraiser for everyone and it’s a lot of fun,” Ms. Hurst said. “We’re excited for it to return next year.”

The 24th annual Maritime Festival is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday with the opening reception Friday night.

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09/12/13 4:00pm
09/12/2013 4:00 PM

KATHARINE SCHROEDER FILE PHOTO | The crew from the Blue Canoe giving out samples of their chowder during last year’s festival.

A grassroots movement to return the beloved chowder contest to this year’s Maritime Festival is underway in Greenport.

With the blessing of festival organizers and a little more than a week left until the big day, the Greenport Farmers’ Market is rushing to confirm enough contestants to revive the competition.

“The chowder contest is inline with our mission at the market as a community food vendor,” said manager KiKi Hurst. “It’s iconic.”

Ms. Hurst said she and fellow residents were inspired to bring back the long-running competition after the East End Seaport Museum decided to replace it with an oyster shucking event for the first time this year.

Last month, Seaport Museum chairman Ron Breuer said the move was not only an effort to better reflect Greenport’s legacy as an oystering community, but also because of the burdensome logistics of organizing the contest.

Participating restaurants were responsible for preparing up to 25 gallons of chowder each, not to mention delivering and properly heating it during the contest.

Establishing a space and covering the expense of renting tents to house the competition was also problematic.

Ms. Hurst said the farmers’ market already has in place a lot of the necessary elements needed to host the contest.

Mr. Breuer said the festival committee supports the endeavor.

“If they can get the resources, they are definitely a part of the festival,” he said.

Ms. Hurst said all the pieces of the puzzle are in place to make the chowder contest happen, but they still need to confirm the contestants.

“We don’t have enough chefs,” she said. “It’s not an event until we have participants.”

Ms. Hurst is in the process of reaching out to local restaurants, but said there would need to be at least eight confirmed contestants to make the contest viable.

The short notice isn’t deterring First & South in Greenport, who participated last year. Owner Sarah Phillips said she is in the process of finalizing the paperwork and fully intends to compete.

“It was definitely short notice, but we want to be a part of the tradition,” she said. “We couldn’t understand why they stopped it in the first place.”

Following a previous article published by the Suffolk Times, a number of readers agreed that ending the chowder contest was a bad idea.

“What’s wrong with clam chowder?” one commenter said. “It’s part of our life and maritime tradition. Why can’t we have both the chowder contest [and oysters]?”

If Ms. Hurst is successful, it appears that just might be the case.

Unlike previous years, the winner would not be crowned by a panel of judges, but rather a voting public. If the contest does happen, tasters would be charged $5 to enter, Ms. Hurst said.

The 24th annual Maritime Festival is scheduled for Sept. 21 and 22, with the opening reception the evening of Sept. 20.

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09/26/12 8:00am
09/26/2012 8:00 AM

KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO | The crew from the Blue Canoe giving out samples of their chowder on Sunday.

The East End Seaport Museum announces the winners of this year’s 2012 Maritime Festival Chowder Contest:

Best in Show: Judged by chefs
1) Salt Waterfront Bar and Grill – Shelter Island, Chef Carrie Mitchum & Darren Boyle
2) Blue Canoe Oyster Bar – Greenport, chef Matty Boudreau
3) Noah’s – Greenport, Chef Noah Schwartz

People’s Choice:
1) Blue Canoe Oyster Bar – Greenport, chef Matty Boudreau
2) Townsend Manor Inn – Greenport, Chef Ian Crowley
3) First and South – Greenport, Chef Taylor Knapp

Judges:
Lead judge John Ross, Tom Scalia, Paula Croteau, Albie De Kerillis, Chris Smith, Mary Morgan and Rosemary Pearce.

“My heart goes out to all the chefs who’ve worked so hard and so creatively to support this event,” said Mr. Ross. “All of the chowders were excellent and showed the public how far we have come as a culinary region. Chowder is truly a soup of the people and as American as apple pie. It was very difficult for us to choose one over the other and we truly appreciate their effort.”

Participating Restaurants:

A Lure- Southold, Chef Tom Schaudel
Bistro 72, Hotel Indigo, Riverhead, Chef Vincent Donofrio
Blue Canoe Oyster Bar – Greenport, chef Matty Boudreau
Cliff’s Elbow Room – Jamesport, Chef Joan Saunders
First and South – Greenport, Chef Taylor Knapp
The Islander, Shelter Island, Chef Chris Chobar
Noah’s – Greenport, Chef Noah Schwartz
Salt Waterfront Bar and Grill – Shelter Island, Chef Carrie Mitchum & Darren Boyle
Townsend Manor Inn – Greenport, Chef Ian Crowley

The chowder contest is sponsored by Albertson Realty.

09/27/10 6:39pm
09/27/2010 6:39 PM

Townsend Manor’s chef Ian Crowley was the People’s Choice for the best chowder cook.

Best in Show winner was A Mano’s chef Tom Schaudel chosen by a panel of judges that included chef John Ross, Paula Crouteau, owner of The Farmhouse Kitchen in Southold; Albie de Kerillis, a graduate of the Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute of Paris; Charis Smith, founder of CMS Architecture & Design, PC in New York, a firm specializing in hospitality and restaurant design; Mary Morgan, an early founder of the East End Chapter of Slow Food; and Tom Scalia from Century 21 Albertson Realty in Greenport, the contest sponsor.