Featured Story
09/04/17 6:01am
09/04/2017 6:01 AM

The wet, cold spring has led to less honey this season on the North Fork.

All bees, not just honeybees, need flowers for food, and Long Island is increasingly losing flowery areas due to residential development and deer eating the plants. READ

08/14/17 5:55am

One hundred years ago, when Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County was started, Long Island had over 100,000 acres of farmland. Most of that acreage was dedicated to potatoes and, considering the massive expansion of the New York City suburbs, it’s interesting to note that potato farms once extended as far west as the Nassau-Queens line. Long Island’s glacier runoff soil was perfectly suited for the growing of potatoes.

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08/23/14 12:00pm
08/23/2014 12:00 PM
Lone star ticks, seen here at different life stages, are among the most abundant tick on the East End. (Credit: Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County)

Lone star ticks, seen here at different life stages, are among the most abundant tick on the East End. (Credit: Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County)

Is that a tick, a chigger, or a tiny spider?

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County is working on creating a handy smartphone app to help East Enders get an answer to that question and many more with the touch of a button. (Spoiler alert: There are no chiggers on Long Island.) (more…)