04/01/18 5:58am
04/01/2018 5:58 AM

About two hours into the March for Our Lives, I experienced multiple epiphanies. In no order of importance these were as follows: that there is a difference between a march and a rally, and what I was part of was actually a rally. I thought I was attending a march and had prepared to walk for miles, if necessary. I didn’t know that I was going to stand, with as little personal space as revelers in Times Square on New Year’s Eve, without the accompanying stimulants, for more than three and a half hours, listening to the heartfelt expressions of sorrow and hope, the voices of young people, amplified from a far-away stage. READ

03/31/18 6:00am
03/31/2018 6:00 AM

Last weekend, hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered in Washington, D.C., and across America to protest the nation’s gun laws. Among those who spoke before the enormous crowds were survivors of the mass shooting in Parkland, Fla. READ

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03/11/18 5:58am
03/11/2018 5:58 AM

To the editor:

I am heartened by more than one article in the Feb. 22 Suffolk Times. I appreciated the words of Steve Choi, the executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition, who responded to Lee Zeldin’s bill, identifying it as “shameless political posturing.” Such a bill would cause many respectable immigrants to be apprehended for no reason at all, and cause citizens to be unnecessarily alarmed.  READ

02/25/18 5:59am
02/25/2018 5:59 AM

Within hours of the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., students who had seen their friends gunned down began demanding change. These students’ voices, which have the earmarks of a budding national movement, may very well herald the start of the kind of discussion that must happen in America about the “right” to own military-style firearms, and gun control in general.  READ

02/22/18 5:59am
02/22/2018 5:59 AM

Just as schools were winding down for winter break, many were once again forced to confront national issues, as school safety and gun control returned to the forefront.

The shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Valentine’s Day left 17 dead. Along with sadness and fear for students’ safety, it has prompted a nationwide call for change. READ

06/13/13 6:00am
06/13/2013 6:00 AM
ABC NEWS COURTESY PHOTO | A sign welcoming visitors to Sandy Hook Elementary School, the site of Friday's mass school shooting that left 26 people dead, including the suspected shooter.

ABC NEWS COURTESY PHOTO | A sign welcoming visitors to Sandy Hook Elementary School.

To the editor:

It’s been six months since 20 first-graders and six teachers were shot to death in Newtown, Conn. While there’s nothing we can do to guarantee a tragedy like this will not happen again, Congress decided to do nothing. In a few moments 26 died and our Congress decides to do nothing?

According to a tally of gun deaths from Slate, the number of people killed since the Dec. 14 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary is now 4,499. The number of U.S. armed forces killed during the Iraq war was 4,409, according to the Defense Department.

Those who support the political idea that anyone and everyone should have unlimited access to as much firepower as they want have had their way. There’s something that can be done and the great majority of us know it. Let’s pass laws that will save the lives of schoolkids and countless others.

In another part of the country, it’s been 24 days since 10 children died in their school in Moore, Okla., from a tornado. After the horror, Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma was asked, “Shouldn’t schools have storm shelters?” The governor refused to say it was time to get these school shelters built. The most she would say was, “We will have a discussion.”

Gov. Fallin is serving the political idea that government requirements to prevent the deaths of schoolchildren are wrong. Everyone knows that school storm shelters save lives and it’s the job of government to do it.

Let’s pass the laws that will save our kids.

Mort Cogen, Cutchogue

To read more letters to the editor, pick up a copy of this week’s Suffolk Times or click on the E-Paper.