Featured Story
09/04/17 6:01am
09/04/2017 6:01 AM

The wet, cold spring has led to less honey this season on the North Fork.

All bees, not just honeybees, need flowers for food, and Long Island is increasingly losing flowery areas due to residential development and deer eating the plants. READ

05/26/16 9:46am

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Joe McInnis was fully prepared last Wednesday when the time came for his presentation to students in a science research class at Southold High School.

After all, the Greenport eighth-grader had already given a similar presentation on his work with honeybees to a group of adults at the New York State Histotechnological Society in Albany.

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08/01/14 10:00am
08/01/2014 10:00 AM
Hippy Hive HoneyBee Cooperative member Sarah Shepherd (center), who has been keeping bees for about five years, takes a good look at what is happening inside a hive, explaining to other members what's happening. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

Hippy Hive HoneyBee Cooperative member Sarah Shepherd (center), who has been keeping bees for about five years, takes a good look at what is happening inside a hive, explaining to other members what’s happening. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

A group of women concerned about the plight of the honeybee has launched a grassroots effort to bring more bees to the area and educate locals about how to support the bee population.

They have formed the Hippy Hive HoneyBee Cooperative, a group open only to women and led by a trio of North Fork residents who are involved in spirituality, health and nature. (more…)