06/28/13 9:59am
06/28/2013 9:59 AM

FILE PHOTO | Superstorm Sandy caused millions in damage to Orient Beach State Park.

Orient Beach State Park is on the receiving end of more than $1 million of federal funding eight months after Superstorm Sandy ravaged the parts of the shoreline.

On Thursday, U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kristen Gillibrand announced the New York Department of Transportation had been awarded approximately $1,783,778 to repair and upgrade the beach’s heavily damaged parkway.

During the storm, the two-mile-long entrance road and Gardiners Bay shoreline sustained serious erosion, and four sections of asphalt roadway were damaged and buried utility lines along the entrance drive were exposed. All of the buildings in the park were flooded and the storm surge and flooding destroyed dozens of trees and washed a lifeguard shack and picnic tables back from the beachfront.

“Superstorm Sandy wreaked havoc along the parkway of Orient Beach State Park,” Mr. Schumer said in a statement. “These federal funds will ensure that local taxpayers are not on the hook for repairing this critical infrastructure. “

In addition to funding repairs, the money will be used toward hazard mitigation prevention measures to protect the facility from future natural disasters and flooding.

The repairs and hazard mitigation funding is being provided by Federal Emergency Management Agency through the state transportation department, which is responsive for maintaining the beach parkway.

In April the beach official re-opened following an extensive restoration, including the removal of hazardous trees, repairing the water treatment facility and elevating all utilities to above the flood zones.

Orient Beach State Park is open daily at 8 a.m. year-round.

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02/19/11 8:00am
02/19/2011 8:00 AM

Eastern Long Island’s U.S. representatives lead the way in environmental issues, according to a report released this week by the national League of Conservation Voters.

Congressman Tim Bishop, Senator Charles Schumer and Senator Kristen Gillibrand all scored a perfect 100 on the report card. The national average was 48 for the Senate and 57 for the House.

The 2010 Scorecard includes 6 Senate and 9 House votes on issues ranging from clean energy to public health protections to wildlife conservation, accordng to the LCV.

The League of Conservation Voters is a non-partisan political action group that works to make environmental protection a top priority for legislators, according to its website.

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