08/07/18 6:00am
08/07/2018 6:00 AM

Along coastlines around the globe, including here on the North Fork, climate change poses the threat of sea level rise. For decades, “shoreline hardening,” by adding manmade seawalls and bulkheads has been looked to as preventative measures for erosion and flooding during storms. 

Now, experts say there’s a better way that could even reverse effects on the coastline and improve water quality. READ

08/01/18 6:00am
08/01/2018 6:00 AM

Gazing out at the Peconic River, Joyce Novak can’t help but ponder its past. 

Ms. Novak, newly appointed director of the Peconic Estuary Program, is especially interested in studying how the estuary has evolved. She already plans to go paleo — by examining fossils — to find some answers.  READ

04/23/18 12:00pm
04/23/2018 12:00 PM

File photo: Peconic Bay near Pine Neck Road in Southold. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

The Peconic Estuary Program is seeking the public’s input on its Comprehensive Conservation Management Plan, which hasn’t seen updates since it was approved in 2001.

The CCMP is the blueprint for how the program focuses its resources to protect and restore the estuary, which stretches east from the headwaters of the Peconic River and includes several bays, ending at Block Island Sound.  — READ

07/14/17 5:40am
07/14/2017 5:40 AM

What makes the North Fork unique is its farmland, salt creeks and Peconic Bay. They draw people here and keep them here. From the point where the Peconic River enters the bay in Riverhead all the way east to Gardiners Bay, this stunning body of salt water is magic. That anywhere on the East Coast there are still farms that run to saltwater, as there are on the North Fork, is testament to generations of people here who refused to sit idly by and watch it all disappear.

READ

07/13/17 5:55am
07/13/2017 5:55 AM

Kevin McDonald remembers 1985, when brown tide was first detected in Peconic Bay. He was recently married, and he and his wife had purchased snorkels and face masks to explore the bay, where the water color was a “light-colored coffee” and it was hard to see six inches in front of their faces.

READ

02/11/15 2:00pm
02/11/2015 2:00 PM
Experts say native plants like these New England asters are preferred for rain gardens. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder, file)

Experts say native plants like these New England asters are preferred for rain gardens. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder, file)

A unique program that allowed for a small number of homeowners in Southold and Southampton towns to earn a rebate of up to $500 for installing rain gardens, rain barrels or other forms of “conservation landscaping” on their properties has been expanded.  (more…)

04/27/14 10:00am
04/27/2014 10:00 AM
Group for the East End's Missy Weiss prepares soil with Victoria Witczak, 9, of Cutchogue, and her sister Julianna, 3, last weekend at Downs Farm Preserve in Cutchogue.

Group for the East End’s Missy Weiss prepares soil with Victoria Witczak, 9, of Cutchogue, and her sister Julianna, 3, last weekend at Downs Farm Preserve in Cutchogue.

Build a rain garden, help the environment, get a reward.

It’s a simple as that.

The federal Peconic Estuary Program, which was created 20 years ago to improve water quality in the Peconics, will offer rewards of up to $500 to residents in Southold’s Hashamomuck Pond watershed area and the Reeves Bay watershed in Flanders who work to combat groundwater pollution by installing rain gardens, rain barrels or other forms of “conservation landscaping” on their properties.  (more…)

03/07/14 2:00pm
03/07/2014 2:00 PM
A fish monitoring training session will be held at Grangebel Park at 12:30 p.m. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

A fish monitoring training session will be held at Grangebel Park at 12:30 p.m. (Credit: Carrie Miller)

The Peconic Estuary Program will host a community water quality workshop Saturday, bringing local citizen and leaders together to discuss different types of projects underway in the communities.

Different efforts including beach cleanups, native plantings and invasive species removal, as well as a fish population monitoring effort in downtown Riverhead will each be discussed.  (more…)

09/28/13 12:00pm
09/28/2013 12:00 PM
CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | Coast of the Long Island Sound in Greenport.

CARRIE MILLER PHOTO | Long Island Sound in Greenport.

In celebration of National Estuaries Day today, thousands of people nationwide will be making a “Toast the Coast,” in appreciation and support of keeping the nation’s rivers, bays and estuaries healthy.

The Peconic Estuary Program (PEP) is asking Long Islanders to join the 25th annual celebration by toasting the coast, and taking a photograph (preferably with the bay in the background) of their toast. Social media hash-tags #ToastTheCoast and #PeconicEstuaryProgram were started on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to get word out about the celebration.

There’s also a photo contest on the Peconic Estuary Program’s Facebook page. The photo with the most likes by Monday will win a prize, program officials said.

“The toast is a nationwide show of support for protecting and restoring the estuaries and coastal areas that provide us and the environment with invaluable benefits,” said Alison Branco, director of the program. “Whether you are raising a glass of fresh water straight from your kitchen tap, or a glass of beer from one of Long Island’s many microbreweries, if it was made on Long Island it relies on keeping our water resources clean and healthy.”

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