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Mattituck Fire District pitches nearly $12M expansion; bond vote planned for June

The Mattituck Fire District is planning a nearly $12 million expansion, with a bond vote planned for sometime in June.

The district has filed an application with the town to merge three parcels for a total of 2.28 acres and expand the firehouse on Pike Street and Route 25, proposing to relocate the original historic firehouse currently on site and demolish the building currently used as district office. Area variances would be required.

The expansion to the existing firehouse would gross 13,260 square feet for four pull-through truck bays, offices and accessory spaces, with an additional 10 parking spots and access to Route 25. The fire department is obligated to provide members with a fitness program, so commissioners said they may consider including a fitness room as well. 

Call volume has doubled over the past 10 years but the fleet has not, and although the department has been meeting demand, there’s increased pressure on existing members, commissioners said.

“When we replace things, we have to follow guidelines … as they change their regulations and requirements, the size of the trucks increase and the needs of the department just generally increases as time goes on and as population increases,” said commissioner Steve Libretto. “It’s to our benefit, and the community’s benefit to be at least on par, if not slightly ahead of the game, as opposed to reactive, because reactive always costs more money.”

The nearly $12 million cost would be approximately $180 per household assessed at $6,000, according to commissioners, who said they’re willing to speak with local organizations about the project. The department plans to hold at least one public meeting before the vote. 

Plans have been in the works since around 2019 and went to the town sometime last year, commissioners said. The fire district declared itself the lead agency under the state environmental quality review act and found the project is an unlisted action that will not have a significant impact on the environment. The next steps are to adopt a resolution for the bond and hold a public meeting.

The Planning Board noted last month that several elements are missing from the site plan, such as plans for exterior lighting and landscaping. The board found the application incomplete and requested, among other things, plans for any outdoor signs; erosion and sediment controls; and proposed parking dimensions.

Correction: An earlier version of this story erroneously reported the cost of the firehouse expansion at $112 million. After a request for a correction, we reviewed a tape of the meeting and determined the cost was communicated as “under $12 million.” We strive for accuracy in all of our stories and deeply regret the error. We’re sorry for any inconvenience it has caused.

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