12/26/14 2:00pm
12/26/2014 2:00 PM
Despite its age — well over 100 years old — and precarious locations near the bay in New Suffolk, the Galley Ho building (center) managed to survive the 1938 hurricane, the 'Perfect Storm' and, most recently, superstorm Sandy, among other weather events. It will soon be renovated, raised and moved for a fifth time — about 30 feet closer to the water — as part of a waterfront development project. (Credit: Andrew Lepre)

Despite its age — well over 100 years old — and precarious locations near the bay in New Suffolk, the Galley Ho building (center) managed to survive the 1938 hurricane, the ‘Perfect Storm’ and, most recently, superstorm Sandy, among other weather events. It will soon be renovated, raised and moved for a fifth time — about 30 feet closer to the water — as part of a waterfront development project. (Credit: Andrew Lepre)

Its location has changed at least four times in less than a century, but one thing pretty much has stayed the same. Throughout its history, the building that’s become known locally as the Galley Ho has served the North Fork food industry in some capacity.

At least, when it wasn’t vacant, as it is today.

From the 1940s into the 21st century, it was a place where locals and visitors to New Suffolk could snack on seafood and have a drink. From the 19th century until before World War II, the simple rectangular structure was involved in the wholesale side of the food business — specifically, making oyster barrels. (more…)