Dance studio wants back in at Southold High

11/02/2010 4:29 PM |




KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTO Main Stage Dance Academy owner Lucille Naar-Saladino of Greenport challenged the Southold Board of Education at its Oct. 27 meeting to reverse its new policy barring the rental of the junior-senior high school auditorium for dance recitals.




All they want is to dance. But it’s where they want to dance that may be a problem.
Main Stage Dance Academy owner Lucille Naar-Saladino of Greenport challenged the Southold Board of Education at its Oct. 27 meeting to reverse its new policy barring the rental of the junior-senior high school auditorium for dance recitals.
It has been Ms. Naar-Saladino’s venue of choice in past years. But after the floor was refinished this summer, board members decided they owe it to Southold taxpayers to cut back on the activities they allow in the auditorium.
That left Ms. Naar-Saladino out in the cold when she inquired about booking the auditorium for a recital in June.
Ms. Naar-Saladino said the district’s educational goals meshed with her own efforts to teach dance “in a positive, supportive and nurturing environment … to enlighten, excite and stimulate our students so they gain confidence and have fun as they learn. We hope that the discipline of dance, as well as the freedom to express themselves, will help all students in other areas of their lives.”
Of the 100 students she teaches, 45 are Southold students, she said. She has volunteered as choreographer for the school’s productions of “Thoroughly Modern Millie” and “Oliver,” giving more time to Southold than her home district of Greenport, she said.
Last year, her recital packed the 605-seat auditorium because it was not only a convenient venue for students and parents but it provided entertainment for area residents at $16 per ticket, Ms. Naar-Saladino said. Students also get pleasure from performing at their own school, she said.
At the same time, she proposed products that would help to protect the stage floor and offered to pay a price that would not only cover expenses for lighting, janitorial services and other costs, but also premium that could be put into a fund to cover maintenance of the stage.
Just how much that might be is something that would have to be worked out if the board decided to reverse its policy.
“I think it warrants conversation,” board president Paulette Ofrias said. At the same time, she noted the decision to bar dance groups from holding recitals wasn’t reached easily. If the board opened the facility to Ms. Naar-Saladino, it would have to do the same for other dance academies, members agreed.
The process of changing the policy would take a few months even if the board agreed immediately to do it, Ms. Ofrias said. That could mean a decision might not be reached in time for Ms. Naar-Saladino to count on the space for 2011, she said.
Board members agreed to consider Ms. Naar-Saladino’s appeal and report back to her at a later date.
[email protected]eview.com

Comments

comments