04/23/17 6:00am
04/23/2017 6:00 AM

Contorting her long, slender frame through the brush at Clark’s Beach in Greenport, village resident Mindy Ryan was reminded of an old game she used to play.

“Remember Twister?” she asked the handful of volunteers within earshot.

Ms. Ryan was one of about a dozen local residents who twisted their way through thorn bushes and other hazards to clean up as much trash as they could in three hours Saturday morning.  READ

06/18/13 8:00am
06/18/2013 8:00 AM

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON FILE PHOTO | The proposed Clark’s beach energy park was discussed at the Greenport Village board work session Monday.

Greenport Mayor David Nyce continued his push to construct an eco-friendly energy park at Clark’s Beach during a Village Board work session Monday evening, requesting the village board’s approval to apply for the project’s first preliminary planning grant from the Regional Economic Development Council.

The grant would fund a study to measure the feasibility of building the proposed solar and wind-generating system on 8.7-acres of village-owned property on the Long Island Sound.

The plan calls for combining wind turbines and solar arrays, generating two to four megawatts of electrical power, which the mayor says could make the village energy independent and stabilize residents’ electric bills.

Mr. Nyce first presented plans of the eco-friendly energy park in March and has since been rallying public support for the idea.

Grant applications are due by August 17.

Board considers alcohol consumption on public property 

Board members are set to vote on a regulation that formally would allow the consumption of alcohol on public property during special events. The resolution is an amendment to the Mass Public Assembly Permit that would authorize private organizations to serve alcohol at Mitchell Park.

The intent is to allow guests of the marina to use the park as a reception area, the mayor said.  The amendment would still prohibit the sale of alcohol and would restrict the events to an enclosed area, he said.

All of the events are subject to approval of the village board regardless of its passage.

Public hearing set to regulate rentals 

Village board members have set a public hearing on a potential law that would set rental regulations for residential properties.

The proposal aims at eliminating illegal apartments within residential homes, which the board believes encourages the deterioration of the Village’s housing stock – leading to blight, excessive traffic, parking problems, an overburden on municipal services and general public health and safety concerns.

The law would establish minimum quality standards for habitation, including partitioned bedrooms and separate entrances, kitchens, electric meters and cable lines.

Homeowners that wish to lease space in their homes would be required to obtain a rental permit. A five-member board appointed by the mayor and approved by the Board of Trustees will review the application.

Those found in violation could face fines of up to $5,000 or imprisonment.

The hearing is scheduled during the board’s next regular meeting on June 24 at 6 p.m. at the Third Street fire station.

Board members to vote on Sterling Street parking ban 

Parking may soon be prohibited on a portion of Sterling Street’s eastern side.

The ban would stretch only about 50 feet on the waterfront side of Sterling Street and would eliminate two to three parking spaces.

Village administrator Dave Abatelli believes cars parked along the waterfront where the road curves have caused unsafe conditions for southbound travelers.

Opponents argue that a parking restriction would make it more difficult for them to access their boats docked in local marinas.

Board members are also set to vote on an amendment to local law during the June 24 meeting.

Stricter requirements for Hollywood filming? 

Greenport has become a hot spot for Hollywood filming in recent years, prompting board members to lay the groundwork on new regulations.

The board is looking to require stricter rules to govern filming to help mitigate traffic and parking concerns, while still enticing Hollywood to bring its projects to Greenport. Members agreed to work with the village code committee to establish the regulations.

“If we don’t encourage it in a controlled way, residents might start to get upset,” Mr. Nyce said.

The proposal comes on the heels of the filming of HBO’s hit series ‘Girls’ in the village.

[email protected]

04/17/13 5:50pm
04/17/2013 5:50 PM

An architect’s rendering for a section of the proposed Clark’s Beach power park.

What do Greenport Village residents think about turning Clark’s Beach into a center for alternative energy? They had their chance to speak out Thursday when te Village Board held the first of its community forums on the idea.

Reporter Cyndi Murray live blogged from the meeting. You can read a recap below.

04/17/13 9:16am

An architect’s rendering for a section of the proposed Clark’s Beach power park.

What do Greenport Village residents think about turning Clark’s Beach into a center for alternative energy? They’ll get their chance to speak tonight.

The Village Board will hold the first of its community forums on the idea at the Floyd Memorial Library from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Earlier this month the board gave Mayor David Nyce permission to pursue the idea he first floated in the fall. The mayor has suggested building a combination of wind and solar energy systems on the 8.7-acre Soundfront beach, which he said could make the village energy independent and stabilize residents’ electric bills.

The cost and methods of financing the project are both unknown. The board gave its verbal approval for Mr. Nyce to build public support and seek grant funds.

[email protected]

04/01/13 3:00pm
04/01/2013 3:00 PM

An architect’s rendering for a section of the proposed Clark’s Beach power park.

What do Greenport Village residents think about turning Clark’s Beach into a center for alternative energy? They’ll get their chance to speak later this month.

The Village Board will hold the first of its community forums on the idea at the Floyd Memorial Library on Wednesday, April 17, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Last week the board gave Mayor David Nyce permission to pursue the idea he first floated in the fall. The mayor has suggested building a combination of wind and solar energy systems on the 8.7-acre Soundfront beach, which he said could make the village energy independent and stabilize residents’ electric bills.

The cost and methods of financing the project are both unknown. The board gave its verbal approval for Mr. Nyce to build public support and seek grant funds.

[email protected]

03/27/13 11:49am
03/27/2013 11:49 AM
JENNIFER GUSTAVSON FILE PHOTO | Tonight's Greenport Village Board work session is at 6 p.m.

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON FILE PHOTO | The Greenport Village Board gave a verbal go-ahead to pursue an eco-friendly park at Clark’s Beach.

Clark’s Beach on Long Island Sound is a tiny step closer to becoming an eco-friendly energy park.

Although it did not take a vote, the Greenport Village Board on Monday gave Mayor David Nyce a verbal go-ahead to pursue transforming the 8.7 Soundfront acres from an off-the-beaten-path beach to the site of a two- to four-megawatt electric generating facility using solar and wind energy.

The mayor’s first task is to generate public support before seeking grant funds for the project he suggested last year.

During its regular meeting the board heard a 45-minute presentation from the Riverhead-based Studio A/B Architects, which started designing a concept for the eco-park in September. At that time the board authorized funds to prepare a mock-up.

The preliminary proposal suggests the project could make the village energy independent and even help stabilize residents’ electric bills.

To meet those energy goals, alternative power sources would be established at both Clark’s Beach and the village sewage treatment plant on Moore’s Lane. The plan calls for a wind turbine of about one-megawatt capacity at each site and solar arrays generating roughly 2 to 3 megawatts of solar power. Most of the solar energy — two megawatts — would be generated at the sewage plant.

In addition to providing alternative energy, Clark’s Beach could also be developed as a public park with trails, camping facilities, an educational facility and a conference center.

The buildings’ themes would revolve around concepts related to the sun, earth, wind and water. A community garden and composting area, solar charging station for electric vehicles and a boardwalk are all included in the concept, as well as up to twenty cabins or campsites that would be available to the public for overnight accommodations. Studio AB Architects depicted the cabins with sundials, green roofs and natural ventilation.

Southold resident Lillian Ball, who assisted Studio A/B in presenting the design concept, said education would be the driving force behind the project.

“We’re talking about making something an energy park, but there’s other elements that make people care about it and want to maintain it,” she said.

“It adds yet another aspect of coming out here,” said Glynis Berry, a partner in Studio A/B and an Orient resident. “We already have agritourism, and adding ecotourism to this mix is a natural combination. We think this will benefit businesses and showcase what people can do.”

For the eco-park to become a reality, the site would need to undergo a host of improvements. Previous farming, sand mining and illegal dumping has damaged much of the area. Removing debris and invasive species are among the initial hurdles.

Upfront costs for the project were not addressed during the meeting, but the mayor said construction would depend on grant availability and financing scenarios.

“Either the funds will work or they won’t,” he said. “We have to wait for the grant process. I think the numbers will work out.”

Mr. Nyce emphasized that the project is in its very early stages. The next step, he said, is soliciting support from the public and county, state and federal officials before applying for grants.

“This can’t be done with one entity,” Ms. Berry said. “There need to be partners.”

See below for the full Clark’s Beach proposal.

[email protected]

Greenport Village’s Eco Energy Park presentation, March 25, 2013

03/25/13 3:00pm
03/25/2013 3:00 PM
JENNIFER GUSTAVSON FILE PHOTO | Tonight's Greenport Village Board work session is at 6 p.m.

JENNIFER GUSTAVSON FILE PHOTO | Tonight’s Greenport Village board meeting is at 6 p.m.

Greenport officials are set to discuss the possibility of transforming Clark’s Beach on Long Island Sound into an eco-friendly energy park during tonight’s regular Village Board meeting at the Third Street firehouse starting at 6 p.m.

The 8.9 Soundfront acres off Sound Avenue in Greenport could potentially be home to a two- to four-megawatt electric generating facility utilizing solar, wind and tidal energy.

A preliminary proposal suggests the project could make the village energy independent, and even help prevent future increases to resident’s electric bills.

Officials have said the waterfront property could also be developed as a public park, educational facility and conference center.

The full agenda for tonight’s meeting is available below. Scroll down to view the Clark’s Beach proposal.

Greenport Village board meeting, March 25, 2013.

Greenport Village’s Eco Energy Park presentation, March 25, 2013