07/30/14 8:00am
The landmark Latham Farm Stand and its views of the bay. (Credit: Suffolk Times, file)

A Suffolk Times file photo of the landmark Latham Farm Stand and its views of the bay.

Ed Latham spent his last moments of life in the same place he spent his first moments of life, his home of Latham Farms in Orient.

He wouldn’t have it any other way.

“He was born on the farm and wanted to die on the farm,” said his nephew, Dick Leslie, also of Orient. “He wanted to watch his crops grow… He spent his last few weeks watching the corn come up.”

Mr. Latham, who was a prominent figure in Orient and known for his family farm, died on Friday, July 25, after a long struggle with artery disease.

Ed Latham

Ed Latham

He had turned 92 on June 6. (more…)

07/27/14 8:00am
Young Farmers Camp coordinator Lucy Senesac plants seeds with Rudy Bruer, 10, of Mattituck and Julia Galasso, 12, of Westhampton. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

Young Farmers Camp coordinator Lucy Senesac plants seeds with Rudy Bruer, 10, of Mattituck and Julia Galasso, 12, of Westhampton. (Credit: Katharine Schroeder)

“Eat your vegetables.”

The phrase may generate a certain queasy feeling in your stomach and an innate desire to defy your mother. Uttered sternly by countless moms over the years to kids of all ages, it’s easy to remember that nothing seemed worse than swallowing the last (or first) bite of broccoli or brussels sprouts.

Lucy Senesac of Sang Lee Farms, however, is determined to change that healthy-eating stereotype.

Sang Lee Farms in Peconic is running a Young Farmer’s Camp for 7- to 12-year-olds on Wednesdays through Aug. 13. Ms. Senesac began working at Sang Lee about four years ago and became eager to share her knowledge with kids.

“I wanted to do something to basically teach other people because I’ve learned so much here,” she explained. “And I’ve just found that it’s so important to learn where your food comes from. It affects so much.”KATHARINE SCHROEDER PHOTOVegetables grow in raised beds.

Ms. Senesac eventually wants to offer classes on healthy and organic eating for adults, but for now she’s starting with kids. This is the first year for the camp, which runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with plenty of fun activities and learning opportunities. Nine children are currently enrolled.

“I wanted to share my passion for good food and eating well with the kids out here because it’s such a great community and there’s so much farming. They just need to be a part of it,” she said.

Camp is complete with hay bales, a chalkboard and garden beds just for the kids. Every week the campers plant and learn about the “vegetables of the week.” In the mornings, they recap what they learned the week before and look to see if anything has sprouted.

Next, Ms. Senesac takes them around Sang Lee to learn about the new vegetables of the week and then they go over an educational topic of the week.

The first week’s topic was “what organic means” the second week’s was bees.

07/24/14 2:00pm
LI Cares started offering free breakfast for kids under age 18 through the end of August. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

LI Cares started offering free breakfast for kids under age 18 through the end of August. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

A 2010 study by food bank L.I. Cares showed that 39 percent of the 283,700 Long Islanders who receive emergency food each year are children under 18 years of age.

So when school goes out for the summer — leaving many kids who receive free and reduced lunches at school without a source of nutrition — hunger assistance organizations such as L.I. Cares and Long Island Harvest find themselves trying to fill in the gaps for families.

With that in mind, L.I. Cares launched a new site for anyone under age 18 in need of a morning meal, opening an open site location in Stotzky Park from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. every weekday.

“I chose it because I live in Riverhead, and to my knowledge it’s a popular park,” Child Nutrition Program Specialist Kerry Tooker explained.

An “open site” food location means that any child 18 and under can receive food there, no prior enrollment necessary.

The Summer Food Service Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and works with food banks to provide free and nutritious meals for children in low-income areas.

Though the meal changes daily, it always includes some type of fruit, a grain like a bagel, muffin or cereal bar, and a choice of milk or chocolate milk. The program started on July 7, and is offered through Aug. 29

Turnout was a little sporadic to start, Ms. Tooker said, varying anywhere from 19 kids to only one, one day.

Though the attendance numbers have picked up in the last week, staying well in the teens every day, Ms. Tooker said that public transportation to the park would be helpful. Currently, no buses run directly to Stotzky.

On Friday afternoons only, free lunch is given out from 12 to 1 p.m. at Ammann Riverfront Park in Riverhead. It is an open feeding site as well, coordinated by L.I. Cares in partnership with Lighthouse Mission of Patchogue.

For the last two years Riverhead Public Library was an open site for the Summer Food Service Program, working with hunger-relief organization Island Harvest, but this year they will not be. During the first year of the program they served 1,068 meals over 39 days.

“When I found out that Stotzky Park was going to be a location for L.I. Cares and that Island Harvest was going to have a site at Flanders Community Center, I thought it would just be duplicating services to have it at the library too,” said head of children’s services Laurie Harrison, who worked with Island Harvest the past two years.

“With resources so scarce, I thought, why drain each others’ resources? But we’ve offered to be a site again next year, so that’s in the works.”

07/18/14 8:00am
Joan Archard of Patchogue holds up her wetsuit Tuesday near Great South Bay, where she's been practicing for this weekend's swim from Greenport to Shelter Island (and maybe back). (Credit: Courtesy photo)

Joan Archard of Patchogue holds up her wetsuit Tuesday near Great South Bay, where she’s been practicing for this weekend’s swim from Greenport to Shelter Island (and maybe back). (Credit: Courtesy photo)

The matriarch of the family — good old granny — always leaves a certain legacy behind. Whether it’s her perfect chocolate-chip cookie recipe or the slightly off-kilter jokes she made, grandmas are known to pass down fond memories.

This summer, Joan Archard of Patchogue is paying homage to her own grandmother’s less conventional achievements through a feat of athleticism to be attempted in Greenport.

Well, off Greenport.  (more…)

07/15/14 6:42pm
A handful of residents spoke at a forum Tuesday about the upcoming shortage of area codes. (Credit: Claire Leaden)

A handful of residents spoke at a forum Tuesday about the upcoming shortage of area codes. (Credit: Claire Leaden)

The possibility of a new area code replacing 631 for part of Suffolk County may be viewed as an annoyance for some. After all, who wants go through their phone to update numbers?

For Larry Huff, the potential change also comes with a more substantial downside: a price tag upwards of $500,000.

Mr. Huff, the vice president of Electronix Systems in Huntington Station, spoke during a public hearing Tuesday afternoon in Riverhead where representatives from the New York State Public Service Commission discussed potential remedies to the predicted area code shortfall.  (more…)

07/10/14 8:00am
Postmaster Kevin Ford helps South Jamesport resident Dan Faraone Tuesday morning. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

Postmaster Kevin Ford helps South Jamesport resident Dan Faraone Tuesday morning. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

The United States Postal Service — which derives all of its revenue from the sale of its products and services — has lost $26 billion over the last three years.

In an effort to stop the bleeding, it has consolidated 141 mail processing facilities nationwide over the last two years, saving nearly $900 million and laying off no employees in the process. (more…)

07/09/14 2:00pm

Phone

Area codes. What began as the replacement for human telephone operators quickly turned into a disclosure of geographical locations, along with — in at least some instances — an indication of social status.

The glamour of Manhattan’s “212” area code even spawned a website where one can spend over $500 to purchase a number with the three special digits.

As they say, all good things must come to an end.  (more…)