04/19/14 8:00am
04/19/2014 8:00 AM
An Italianate style home on Bay Avenue. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

An Italianate style home on Bay Avenue. (Credit: Barbaraellen Koch)

Greenport’s historic architecture is a modern-day link to the village’s storied past. The buildings illustrate its progression from pre-Revolutionary roots through its commercial peak as a whaling hub into a modern-day working waterfront with a thriving tourism industry. 

Read more about Greenport’s historic architecture at northforker.com.

04/12/14 9:00am
04/12/2014 9:00 AM
Builder Matthew Ritter (left) discusses placement of a new wooden railing with Bennett Brokaw, who is restoring this 19th-century house on Main Street in Greenport. (Credit: Rachel Young)

Builder Matthew Ritter (left) discusses placement of a new wooden railing with Bennett Brokaw, who is restoring this 19th-century house on Main Street in Greenport. (Credit: Rachel Young)

Independent real estate broker Bennett Brokaw couldn’t look away from the dilapidated Victorian house at 449 Main St. in Greenport.

“I kept seeing the building with this sign that said ‘For sale,’ ” said the Mattituck resident, who purchased the 1,750-square-foot house for $450,000 in November. “After about three or four months, I finally picked up the phone.”

Ever since, Mr. Brokaw has been financially and emotionally invested in the house, as he works to restore it to its original beauty. His vision, he said, is to lease it to a local winery or restaurant — his “dream tenants,” he said — as early as this month.

Read more on northforker.com

04/05/14 9:00am
04/05/2014 9:00 AM
In this undated postcard, campers play on the lawn of the Saint Thomas Home in East Marion, which provided a summer respite for hundreds of New York City children from 1893 to 1925. (Credit: Oysterponds Historical Society)

In this undated postcard, campers play on the lawn of the Saint Thomas Home in East Marion, which provided a summer respite for hundreds of New York City children from 1893 to 1925. (Credit: Oysterponds Historical Society)

East 60th Street, New York City.

It’s a fashionable address now, but at the turn of the last century the neighborhood was home to hundreds of Irish and German immigrants, many of whom lived in crowded, unclean tenements and were parishioners at nearby Saint Thomas Episcopal Church.

In the late 19th century, Saint Thomas provided a number of social services to families living in the tenements. Among these was the introduction of a summer camp for children at a 75-acre property on Long Island Sound in East Marion, 100 miles away.

The property was purchased for $4,485.40 using part of a donation received from a New York City philanthropist. The camp was established so the church could offer city boys and girls an opportunity to get away to the North Fork for two- to four-week stays, during which they could benefit from fresh sea air and exercise.

The children had, as a church bulletin from the period stated, “perfect freedom to wander where they would.”

And until 1925 — the year the camp dissolved amid mounting repair costs — that’s just what children did at the Saint Thomas Summer Home: They wandered. They played.

Read more on northforker.com.